Kansas Gardener’s Garden August-September

Part 3 of my gardens. The saga continues….

This is the Monarch Waystation in late summer, full of rudbeckias and garden phlox and grasses. The double-flowered rudbeckia variety is ‘Hortensia’ from my grandmother’s garden in Cloud County, KS. The tallest grass in the middle is switchgrass ‘Dallas Blues’, one of the first things I ever bought from Grimm’s Gardens!

The double-flowered rudbeckia variety is ‘Hortensia’ from my grandmother’s garden in Cloud County, KS. The tallest grass in the middle is switchgrass ‘Dallas Blues’, one of the first things I ever bought from Grimm’s Gardens!

Another view of the Monarch Waystation from the signpost area! 

The summer time view of the Daylily Bed and Lower and Upper Terrace Gardens. 

I decided to use this style of brick edging in the backyard around all the beds, it gives the place a homier look. 

The Sunny Cottage Garden with blooming ‘American Gold Rush’ rudbeckia, sedum, and statice., shortly after the addition of the new brick edging.

While I do have a family heirloom grinding wheel, this one I bought from the neighbors for $40. It makes a nice centerpiece to the Sunny Cottage Garden. ‘Creme Brulee’ coreopsis (bottom left), Liatris aspera (middle left), and goldenrod ‘Fireworks’ (top center) are all enjoying the autumnal rains. 

The Woodland Shade Border in August and September boasts a plethora of white-blooming black snakeroot, a weedy native woodland perennial. But is makes a nice filler. 

Another shot of goldenrod ‘Fireworks’ just as it starts to bloom.

Here is goldenrod ‘Fireworks’ in full glory alongside hairy aster. These two pair well, since they have similar growth rates and bloom at the same time in late summer.

Above are just some of newer blooms to the garden. The rose turtlehead and rudbeckia ‘Little Henry’ were additions to the garden in 2018, the rest were added this year. Common jewelweed is a woodland annual that was seeded into the Woodland Shade Border. Willowleaf sunflower ‘First Light’ is a cultivar that stays 3-4 feet tall and wide, instead of the 10-15 feet tall native species. Lychnis and sneezeweed were additions to the Sunny Cottage Garden this summer. 

 

The final installment of my garden tour will come on December 26th, Merry Christmas!

 

Happy planting!

 

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